JPSE Volume 24 - 2022

Templates and Tools - Pages 1 to 14

Tips for Successful Web-based Training

Brett Wells Bultemeier, Extension Assistant Professor, University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Pesticide Information Office, Gainesville, FL, bwbult@ufl.edu

Michelle Atkinson, Extension Agent II, UF/IFAS Extension, Manatee County Extension, Palmetto, FL, michelleatkinson@ufl.edu

Erin Harlow, Extension Agent II, UF/IFAS Extension, Columbia County Extension, Lake City, FL, eeeck@ufl.edu

Dewayne Hyatt, System Administrator IV, UF/IFAS Information Technology (IT), Gainesville, FL, dehyatt@ufl.edu

Abstract

The COVID-19 virus forced many pesticide safety education programs to conduct training exclusively online in 2020. Although the transition was sudden, and for some temporary, many programs will continue to utilize online technologies for pesticide training. While online programs are convenient, more effort and consideration are required beyond opening a webinar and presenting material. Ensuring the presenter can be clearly seen and heard, without distractions, is accomplished by properly setting locations for camera, lighting, and microphones. Slide design and transitions likely need to be altered to maintain audience attention. Unique online considerations like bandwidth must be addressed to maximize engagement. Finally, maintaining an online audience’s attention through interactions must be different from in-person training. This article provides essential tips and guidance on better hosting for online training of pesticide safety education. 

KEYWORDS:  applicator recertification, COVID-19 pandemic, Microsoft Teams, pesticide safety education programs, virtual training, Zoom

Full Text: 83-114-1-BAHH.pdf

Commentary - Pages 15 to 21

IPM, Pesticides, and Risk – Part I: The Untold Story

Dan Wixted, Extension Support Specialist III, Cornell Cooperative Extension Pesticide Safety Education Program, Ithaca, NY, djw47@cornell.edu

Abstract 

Integrated pest management and pesticide safety education programs seek to help people minimize risks to people and the environment when managing pests. Yet these programs overlook many relevant risks in their programming. The author discusses the adverse consequences of this and provides an example of how to correct the situation.

KEYWORDS: integrated pest management, non-chemical risks, risk communication, risk perception

Full Text: 83-1521-W.pdf

Commentary - Pages 22 to 27

IPM, Pesticides, and Risk – Part II: Conquering the Contradiction Conundrum

Dan Wixted, Extension Support Specialist III, Cornell Cooperative Extension Pesticide Safety Education Program, Ithaca, NY, djw47@cornell.edu

Abstract 

Integrated pest management and pesticide safety education programs seek to help people minimize risks to people and the environment when managing pests. Yet these programs use oft-repeated phrases can confuse and steer them away from the least-risk option. The author discusses the consequences of these phrases and urges a change in messaging.

KEYWORDS: integrated pest management, least-toxic pesticide, risk characterization

Full Text: 83-2227-W.pdf

Templates and Tools - Pages 28 to 41

Innovative Virtual Pesticide Recertification Webinar Series Achieves Success during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Ronda Hirnyck, Extension Professor, University of Idaho/College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (UI/CALS) Pesticide Programs, Boise, ID, rhirnyck@uidaho.edu

Kimberly Tate, Associate Extension Instructor, UI/CALS, Pesticide Safety Education Program, Boise, ID, ktate@uidaho.edu

William J. Price, Director of Statistical Programs, UI/CALS, Statistical Programs, Moscow, ID, bprice@uidaho.edu

Doug Finkelnburg, Area Extension Educator, UI/CALS, Nez Perce County Extension, Lewiston, ID, dougf@uidaho.edu

Danielle Gunn, Extension Educator, UI/CALS, Fort Hall Reservation, Fort Hall, ID, dgunn@uidaho.edu

Steven Hines, Extension Educator, UI/CALS, Jerome County Extension, Jerome, ID, shines@uidaho.edu

Jerry Neufeld, Extension Educator, UI/CALS, Canyon County Extension, Caldwell, ID, jerryn@uidaho.edu

Brad Stokes, Extension Educator, UI/CALS, Elmore County Extension, Mountain Home, ID, bstokes@uidaho.edu

Abstract

Pesticide safety education programs (PSEP) for recertification were halted due to the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. However, pesticide applicators needed relevant, easy access to educational material to maintain their pesticide licenses through continuing education credit (CEC) programs. University of Idaho (UI) PSEP addressed applicator needs by delivering online webinars that met state CEC regulations. The UI PSEP staff launched a project to measure the demographics of attendees, online program effectiveness, and impacts of using online delivery for PSEP recertification programming.

KEYWORDS: applicator recertification, continuing education credits, online webinars, pesticide safety education programs, Zoom

Full Text: 83-2841-HTPFGHNS.pdf

Review - Pages 42 to 43

A Review of the “How to Comply with the 2015 Revised Worker Protection Standard for Agricultural Pesticides” Manual

Emily Kraus, Assistant Extension Scientist, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Pesticide Information Office, Gainesville, FL, emilyckraus@ufl.edu

Full Text: 83-4243-K.pdf



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 Journal of Pesticide Safety Education by American Association of Pesticide Safety Educators is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

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